NFRC logo

Component Modeling Approach Program

For the past 20 years, the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) has provided a fair, accurate, and credible rating and labeling system for windows, doors, and skylights used in residential construction. Now NFRC is providing the non-residential market with a powerful and exciting online program known as the Component Modeling Approach (CMA).

What is CMA?
CMA is a groundbreaking concept in the non-residential fenestration industry. It offers performance information on fenestration components through an online database. This is essentially a library that houses data on a wide variety of fenestration components and is available all of the time from anywhere in the world.

CMA shows how changing one component affects overall energy efficiency and provides information on which components can be combined. Ultimately, the information obtained from CMA can be used to determine a whole product energy performance rating for a fenestration system.

This rating information is incorporated into a CMA Label Certificate for product validation. The label certificate lists the performance for all fenestration systems for a given building project.

Furthermore, any products certified for a particular project can be used in subsequent projects without recertification. Finally, components and certified products are maintained indefinitely in CMA.

How is CMA Organized?
CMA is organized into three primary components:

Glazing

Frame

Spacer

Optical/spectral data from the International Glazing Database

Thermal performance data of frame cross-sections

Thermal performance of spacer component materials

Why did NFRC create CMA?
NFRC developed CMA to:

What’s in it for me?
Architects and builders:

Building officials, state government employees, and other involved in code development and enforcement:

Government- and utility-run energy-efficiency programs:

Manufacturers/contractors:



Questions about the key differences between the NFRC's Commercial Ratings Program and AAMA's 507 document? NFRC tips the scales

When it comes to rating and certifying the fenestration for your project, you have at least 10 reasons to come down on the side of NFRC rather than AAMA 507


How can I learn more about CMA?

Enter your contact information in the CMA Interest form. You will hear back from NFRC staff within a few days.

NFRC also has an online video that explains the Component Modeling Approach.

If you are a code official, NFRC has a website that brings all of your energy codes information into one place.

There's also an Energy Codes Solutions Series of webinars that might interest you:Commercial Building

Commercial Fenestration Energy Code Compliance just got Easier with NFRC

Building code officials can learn to get their numbers quickly and easily during this hour-long webinar.
After this webcast, you will:

Presenter: Ray McGowan, Senior Program Manager (240-821-9510)

Visit the NFRC webinars page to register and join us for the latest in the series.


Utah Valley Convention Center Finds Right Tool for the Job in NFRC’s CMA Program

“CMA was integral in streamlining the selection, certification, and code compliance processes for the fenestration on this project. It’s the kind of tool you can rely on to get things done easier than ever before.” --Todd Reynolds

Todd Reynolds wanted to simplify the process for achieving building energy code compliance and providing third-party certification for the glazed curtain wall surrounding the Utah Convention Center. He found just what he was looking for in the National Fenestration Rating Council’s (NFRC) Component Modeling Approach (CMA) Program. Click here for the full story